BSA Motorcycles: service & workshop manuals PDF

Title

File Size

Download Links

BSA 844 VICTOR Workshop Manual.pdf

7.4Mb

Download

BSA A7/ A10 Instruction Manual.rar

4.9Mb

Download

BSA Ariel 3 Owner's Handbook Manual 1970.pdf

5.7Mb

Download

BSA B25SS Gold Star Workshop Manual 1971.pdf

17.6Mb

Download

BSA b50 series Owner's Handbook Manual.pdf

2.3Mb

Download

BSA Bantam D14-4 Workshop Manual.pdf

1.9Mb

Download

BSA C10L/ C12/ D3 Owners Manual 1956.rar

2Mb

Download

BSA C15T Instruction Manual 1962.pdf

5.8Mb

Download

BSA D1 125 c.c. Bantam Instruction Manual.pdf

2Mb

Download

BSA D1 Parts Catalog 1949-1953.rar

34.7Mb

Download

BSA D1/ D3/ D5 Instruction Manual.pdf

929.4kb

Download

BSA D10 Instruction Manual.pdf

786.6kb

Download

BSA D14 Instruction Manual.pdf

698.4kb

Download

BSA D14/ 4 Workshop Manual.rar

2.3Mb

Download

BSA D3/ C10L/ C12 Owners Manual 1956.rar

2Mb

Download

BSA D7 Instruction Manual.pdf

684.2kb

Download

BSA M20 Maintenance Manual And Instruction Book.pdf

2.5Mb

Download

BSA M20 Maintenance Manual.doc

5.4Mb

Download

BSA Victor Grand Prix Workshop Manual.pdf

9.6Mb

Download

BSA Wiring Diagrams.rar

340.9kb

Download

Surprisingly, the history of the BSA motorcycle brand began in the extremely distant 1692, namely, from the time of the reign of King William III. At that time, the British had to make arms purchases from the Netherlands, and on the initiative of William III, an agreement was signed with five Birmingham gunsmiths, and later the Birmingham Association of Small Arms Merchants was also organized, which was renamed Birmingham Small Arms Company in 1861.

 

Two years later, a small factory was established in Small Heath, on the basis of which BSA was founded. True, the first bicycles were produced only after 17 years. And in 1881, the company began its first independent project. For a long 12 years, attention was once again focused on weapons. Only in 1893 the company returned to the production of components for bicycles, and somewhat later for motorcycles. This went on for ten years.

In 1903, the actual assembly of motorcycles began on the basis of parts supplied by various companies. In particular, the supply of engines was undertaken by the Belgian company Minerva. And only in 1909 was really created his own motorcycle. But all plans were violated in connection with the outbreak of the First World War.

 

BSA was forced to switch back to military production. The weekly production of rifles reached 10,000 copies. Along with them, ambulances and staff cars were produced. The war ended, and for the umpteenth time the company switched production from “swords” to “screaming”. Two single-cylinder motorcycle models, designed before the war, went on sale. The production of V-engines, which were best suited for motorcycles with a sidecar, was also adjusted.

In 1921, BSA executives decided to try their production capacity in competitions, putting up the six best motorcycles for racing. But the company was waiting for a terrible fiasco. Not a single car reached the finish line - their pistons simply melted.

 

Work continued, and the forerunner of future success was the acquisition of Daimler. Excellent specialists came to the BSA, including design engineer Harold Briggs. He developed a small motorcycle with an engine capacity of 350 cubic centimeters, the maximum speed of which was up to 120 kilometers per hour. Its feature was the bottom valves.

 

Another engineer, Harry Poole, was involved in the Model B machine, nicknamed the "round tank." The Model B motorcycle was very popular in Germany. Over the entire existence of the brand, about 35,000 copies were sold. But the best BSA bike of those times was considered a motorcycle called Slouper. It was equipped with a slightly tilted forward engine of 500 cubic meters with a single top valve. It was first launched in 1927.

Motorcycles brand BSA participated in various exhibitions. For example, the new A7 with an engine of 500 “cubes” was introduced in 1947 in Paris. And a year later, at the next show, viewers saw the conceptually new Bentem. It was a development of the DKW-RT125 project, it was equipped with a 125 cc engine and some other features, thanks to which it became the best-selling English motorcycle in history.

 

BSA-made bikes continued their performances at various competitions, such as the Isle of Man TT, ISDT and Golden Star, where they earned many awards and set a speed record of 120 kilometers per hour.

BSA workshop manuals pdf
BSA M20
Comments: 0